The Magical Food That Cures Many Ailments Without Side Effects

Here’s a very interesting article a facebook friend sent me a little while back that I’d like to pass on for others to potentially benefit from………………. 

Did you know that you may have the magical combination to cure many ailments in your kitchen right now? No need for harmful prescriptions drugs or over-the-counter-drugs that may have adverse interactions.
Take advantage of some helpful tips & information I’d like to pass on to you.

What are the magical ingrdients I’m making refernece to?

Cinnamon and RAW Honey

………………………….. Just remember I emphasized the key word….. R A W  honey!

Drug companies probably wouldn’t like this one getting around.

Here are a few facts on RAW Honey and Cinnamon:honey-cinnamon-benefits

It is found that a mix of honey and cinnamon CURES most diseases. Honey is produced in most of the countries of the world. Scientists of today also note honey isin fact very effective medicine for many kinds of diseases. Honey can be used without side effects which is also a major plus.

Let me break it down for you……………………….

HEART DISEASES:

Make a paste of honey and cinnamon powder, put it on toast instead of jelly and jam and eat it regularly for breakfast. It reduces the cholesterol and could potentially save one from a heart attack. Also, even if you have already had an attack studies show you could be kept miles away from the next attack. Regular use of cinnamon honey strengthens the heart beat. In America and Canada, various nursing homes have treated patients successfully and have found that as one ages the arteries and veins lose their flexibility and get clogged; honey and cinnamon revitalize the arteries and the veins.

ARTHRITIS:

Arthritis patients can benefit by taking one cup of hot water with two tablespoons of honey and one small teaspoon of cinnamon powder. When taken daily even chronic arthritis can be cured. In a recent research conducted at the Copenhagen University, it was found that when the doctors treated their patients with a mixture of one tablespoon Honey and half teaspoon Cinnamon powder before breakfast, they found that within a week (out of the 200 people that were treated) practically 73 patients were totally relieved of pain — and within a month, most all the patients who could not walk or move around because of arthritis now started walking without pain.

BLADDER INFECTIONS:

Take two tablespoons of cinnamon powder and one teaspoon of honey in a glass of lukewarm water and drink it. It destroys the germs in the bladder….who knew?

CHOLESTEROL:

Two tablespoons of honey and three teaspoons of Cinnamon Powder mixed in 16 ounces of tea water given to a cholesterol patient was found to reduce the level of cholesterol in the blood by 10 percent within two hours. As mentioned for arthritic patients, when taken three times a day, any chronic cholesterol-could be cured. According to information received in the said Journal, pure honey taken with food daily relieves complaints of cholesterol.

COLDS:

Those suffering from common or severe colds should take one tablespoon lukewarm honey with 1/4 spoon cinnamon powder daily for three days. This process will cure most chronic cough-type colds AND clear the sinuses too! Another small  perk – it’s delicious!!

UPSET STOMACH:

Honey taken with cinnamon powder cures stomach ache and also is said to clear stomach ulcers from its root.

GAS:

According to the studies done in India and Japan, it is revealed that when Honey is taken with cinnamon powder the stomach is relieved of gas.

IMMUNE SYSTEM:

Daily use of honey and cinnamon powder strengthens the immune system and protects the body from bacterial and viral attacks. Scientists have found that honey has various vitamins and iron in large amounts. Constant use of Honey strengthens the white blood corpuscles (where DNA is contained) to fight bacterial and viral diseases.

INDIGESTION:

Cinnamon powder sprinkled on two tablespoons of honey taken before food is eaten relieves acidity and digests the heaviest of meals.

INFLUENZA:

A scientist in Spain has proved that honey contains a natural ‘Ingredient’ which kills the influenza germs and saves the patient from flu.

LONGEVITY:

Tea made with honey and cinnamon powder, when taken regularly, arrests the ravages of old age. Use four teaspoons of honey, one teaspoon of cinnamon powder, and three cups of boiling water to make a tea. Drink 1/4 cup, three to four times a day. It keeps the skin fresh and soft and arrests old age. Lifespans will actually increase and even it make possible that someone who may be 100 years old will start performing the chores of  someone half their age.

RASPY OR SORE THROAT:

When one’s throat has a tickle or is raspy, take one tablespoon of honey and sip until gone. Repeat every three hours until throat is without symptoms.

PIMPLES:

Three tablespoons of honey and one teaspoon of cinnamon powder paste – Apply this paste on the pimples before sleeping and wash it off the next morning with warm water. When done daily for two weeks, it removes all pimples from the root.

SKIN INFECTIONS:

Applying honey and cinnamon powder in equal parts on the affected parts cures eczema, ringworm and all types of skin infections.

WEIGHT LOSS:

Once daily in the morning ,one half hour before breakfast and on an empty stomach, and then once again at night before sleeping, drink honey and cinnamon powder boiled in one cup of water. When taken regularly, it reduces the weight of even the most obese person. Also, drinking this mixture regularly does not allow the fat to accumulate in the body even though the person may eat a high calorie diet.

CANCER:

Recent research in Japan and Australia has revealed that advanced cancer of the stomach and bones have been cured successfully. Patients suffering from these kinds of cancer should take one tablespoon of honey with one teaspoon of cinnamon powder three times a day for one month.

FATIGUE:

Recent studies have shown that the sugar content of honey is more helpful rather than being detrimental to the strength of the body. Senior citizens who take honey and cinnamon powder in equal parts are more alert and flexible. Dr. Milton, who has done research, says that a half tablespoon of honey taken in a glass of water and sprinkled with cinnamon powder, even when the vitality of the body starts to decrease, when taken daily after brushing and in the afternoon at about 3:00 P.M., the vitality of the body increases within a week.

BAD BREATH:

People in South America gargle with one teaspoon of honey and cinnamon powder mixed in hot water first thing in the morning so their breath stays fresh throughout the day.

HEARING LOSS:

Taken twice daily, once in the morning and once at night, honey and cinnamon powder, taken in equal parts restores hearing.

honey-cinnamon-cures-chart

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April Fool’s Day Fun & Traditions

Though pranksters and joke-lovers in many countries now gleefully prepare to dupe friends and loved ones on April Fool’s Day, no one knows exactly when or why, or even where, this tradition began.

A giddy spurt of practical joking seems to have coincided with the coming of spring since the time of the Ancient Romans and Celts, who celebrated a festival of mischief-making. The first mentions of an All Fool’s Day (as it was formerly called) came in Europe in the Middle Ages.

Some trace April Fool’s Day back to Roman mythology, particularly the story of Ceres, Goddess of the harvest, and her daughter, Proserpina.

Pluto, God of the Dead, abducted Proserpina and took her to live with him in the underworld. The girl called out to her mother, but Ceres could only hear the echo of her daughter’s voice and searched for her in vain.

Such “fool’s errands,” or wild goose chases, became a popular practical joke in Europe in later centuries.

The most widespread theory of the origin of April Fool’s Day is the switch from the old Julian to the Gregorian calendar (now in use) in the late 16th century. Under the Julian calendar, the New Year was celebrated during the week between March 25 and April 1, but under the Gregorian calendar, it was moved to Jan. 1. Those who were not notified of the change, or stubbornly kept to the old tradition, were often mocked and had jokes played on them on or around the old New Year.

In France, this took the form of pranksters sticking fish on the backs of those who celebrated the old custom, earning the victims of the prank the name Poisson d’Avril, or April Fish.

But the theory can’t explain why the pranking tradition spread to other countries in Europe that did not adopt the Gregorian calendar until later.

In Scotland, the butts of April Fool’s jokes were known as April “Gowks,” another name for a cuckoo bird. The origins of the “Kick Me” sign can supposedly be traced back to the Scottish observance of the day.

In more recent times, radio stations, TV programs and Web sites have set up gullible readers and listeners. One of the most notorious jokes was a 1957 hoax BBC documentary of the annual spaghetti harvest in Switzerland, featuring a family plucking strands of the pasta from “spaghetti trees.” The Italian favorite was still considered an exotic delicacy in Britain at the time, and many listeners were so fooled they wanted to find out how to get a spaghetti bush of their own.

On April 1, 2007 Internet search engine Google announced their new Gmail Paper service, where users of the free email service could save emails to a paper archive in which Google would print out and mail for free. Last year, Google invited people to sign up for a Mars exploration project.

So while you’re surfing the web or watching TV today, be wary of what you see and read, or you could end up an April Fool!

Original Source: Life’s Little Mysteries

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APRIL FOOL’S DAY LINKS

— JUST FOR FUN —

April Fool’s Day On The Web 2010

This site is one of the most complete/comprehensive listings of April Fools’ Day jokes that websites have run each year — starting in 2004 — all the way up to this year, 2010 — Features several pages of online jokes, tricks and “foolery”, loaded with images — Make sure you check out the full list — and if you have come across a site that is not already listed, you can add on to it.
Bookmark this site so you don’t get fooled online this year!

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Top 100 April Fool’s Day Hoaxes of All Time

These are judged by notoriety, creativity as well as the number of people duped.

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Top 10 Worst April Fool’s Day Hoaxes Ever –

The above list of the Top 100 April Fool’s Day jokes celebrates the best of April 1st. But sometimes April 1st inspires attempts at humor that doesn’t turn out so well. Some attempts are, in fact, truly awful. That’s what this list explores.

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Take The Hoax Photo Test

Test your pop culture literacy by determining which are the hoax photos (like those that have been manipulated in some way) and which are real.

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Take The Gullibility Test

Pretend that you’re an editor at a major newspaper. A reporter has just handed you a story that contains the following statements. Unfortunately, this reporter has a reputation for embellishing stories with wild claims that are completely untrue. Using common sense and whatever you happen to know about the subjects, you’ve got to decide which statements are true and which are false before the paper goes out to print. Saying “I don’t know” is NOT an option.

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Hoaxapedia

The Hoaxipedia is an online encyclopedia of hoaxes, urban legends, pranks, tall tales, scams, and deceptions of all kind. It is a work-in-progress, currently containing approximately two hundred articles.

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Museum of Hoaxes

This site examines dubious claims and mischief of everything imaginable.

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Gallery of Hoax Websites –

These are NOT websites about hoaxes – These are sites that actually ARE hoaxes themselves!

Funny, peculiar, weird, irreverent, off-the-wall, etc…

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Wikipedia

This is Wikipedia’s entry for everything dealing with April Fool’s Day.

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You Know What They Say About Fools?

Here you’ll find some famous as well as a few lesser known comments and sayings from a few well known authors as well as other named celebrities throughout history.

  • It’s better to keep your mouth shut and be thought a fool than to open it and leave no doubt. —Mark Twain
  • However big the fool, there is always a bigger fool to admire him. — Nicolas Boileau-Despréaux
  • [Politicians] never open their mouths without subtracting from the sum of human knowledge. — Thomas Reed
  • He who lives without folly isn’t so wise as he thinks. — François, Duc de La Rochefoucauld
  • The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly, is to fill the world with fools. — Herbert Spencer
  • Sometimes one likes foolish people for their folly, better than wise people for their wisdom. — Elizabeth Gaskell
  • Looking foolish does the spirit good. — John Updike
  • Let us be thankful for the fools. But for them the rest of us could not succeed. — Mark Twain
  • A fool sees not the same tree that a wise man sees. — William Blake
  • A fool must now and then be right by chance. — Cowper
  • It is better to be a fool than to be dead. — Stevenson
  • The first of April is the day we remember what we are the other 364 days of the year. — Mark Twain

Bizarre Strange & Unusual Phobias

On a previous post I focused predominately on the more common fears that many people have in general. Now I wanted to highlight the more uncommon, most unusual, bizarre, strange and downright weird phobias that afflict a number of people.

Some of the information presented here will repeat what I originally stated in a previous post a few months back that you will find here >> What Really Scares People: Top 10 Fears

Instead of an evolutionary or culture-led phobia, there may be a separate explanation for weird or strange phobias, such as the fear of cheese. This group of phobias may be linked to deep-seated psychological trauma. For whatever reason, that inanimate object or non-threatening situation has become the focus of the fear, and acts as a trigger for stored feelings of anxiety.

The common “specific phobias” – such as the fear of spiders, or snakes, or being struck by lightning – are all understandable… at least on some level. We may not fully understand the extreme fear response some people give them but somewhere in there is a threat to survival.

Below you will find a list of uncommon – and in some cases – bizarre phobias – which really do prove utterly terrifying and disgusting to a small part of the general population.

  • Ablutophobia – the obsessional fear of bathing
  • Adipophobia – the fear of appearing too fat
  • Agyrophobia – the fear of crossing roads
  • Ambulophobia – the fear of walking
  • Anablephobia – the fear of looking up
  • Androphobia – the fear of men
  • Anthophobia – the fear of flowers
  • Arachibutyrophobia – the fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of one’s mouth
  • Aulophobia – the fear of flutes
  • Barophobia – the fear of gravity
  • Cataptrophobia – the fear of mirrors
  • Chionophobia – the fear of snow
  • Chorophobia – the fear of dancing
  • Chromatophobia – the fear of colors
  • Chronomentrophobia – the fear of time
  • Cnidophobia – the fear of string
  • Cyberphobia – the fear of working with computers
  • Decidophobia – the fear of making decisions
  • Ephebiphobia the fear of teenagers
  • Ergophobia – the fear of work, finding work or functioning at work
  • Erotophobia – the fear of sex or talking about sex
  • Gelotophobia – the obsessional fear of being laughed at
  • Genuphobia – the fear of knees
  • Geumapobia – the fear of taste
  • Gerontophobia – the fear of growing old or fear of the elderly
  • Gymnophobia – the fear of being seen naked or seeing others naked
  • Gynophobia – the fear of women
  • Haptephobia – the fear of being touched
  • Heliophobia – the fear of sunlight
  • Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia – the fear of long words 😛 Really!
  • Hypnophobia – the fear of sleep
  • Kyphophobia – the fear of stooping
  • Levophobia – the fear of objects to the left
  • Megalophobia – the fear of large or oversized objects
  • Metrophobia – the fear of poetry
  • Mnemophobia – the fear of memories
  • Nomophobia the fear of being out of cellular/mobile phone contact
  • Octophobia – the fear of the figure eight
  • Ommetaphobia – the fear of eyes
  • Osmophobia – the fear of smells
  • Optophobia – the fear of opening one’s eyes
  • Papaphobia – the fear of the Pope
  • Peladophobia – the fear of bald people
  • Phagophobia the fear of swallowing
  • Phobophobia – the fear of having a phobia
  • Scopophobia the fear of being looked at
  • Scuirophobia – the fear of squirrels
  • Siderophobia – the fear of stars
  • Somniphobia – the fear of sleep
  • Spectrophobia the fear of mirrors
  • Trichophobia the fear of loose hairs
  • Triskaidekaphobia the fear of the number 13
  • Xenophobia – the fear of strangers, foreigners or aliens

A Final Thought

And finally, spare a thought for those very select poor folks who suffer from Panophobia – which translates to those  who are perpetually and continuously afraid of EVERYTHING…..

Does Your State Have Money That Belongs To You?

How would you feel if you found out your state owes you money?

It’s a pretty good feeling to realize that you may just happen to have money out there that you’re unaware of — in your name — at the State Controller’s or Treasurer’s Office — even more so in these tough economic times when money is so tight and most of us are trying to be so frugal.

There are actually quite a few people out there who do have money – with their name on it – listed, for example, on the California State Controller’s Office Web site under the “unclaimed property” section. The office’s website states that it’s currently in possession of over $5 billion in unclaimed property that belongs to about 11.6 million California residents, businesses and organizations. And that’s just in California alone — now consider what may be hiding in the other 49 states treasury vaults in unclaimed money and property.

At any given time, research shows that state governments are holding more than $10 billion in unclaimed money as well as other properties. Banks, insurance companies, utility companies, government agencies and other entities across the nation are believed to still be holding at least this amount. Some 30 million Americans are believed to have unclaimed money owed to them, just waiting to be discovered first, then recovered. Here you will find state government resources for searching data bases, finding and then submitting a claim to collect some of that unclaimed money and property.

In California, State Controller John Chiang commented that, until a few years ago, state legislation didn’t allow staff to notify nearly 80 percent of it’s residents about their unclaimed ‘goods’. Now that just recently changed in 2007 when newly signed legislation allowed the controller’s office to send notices to residents when their unclaimed money is about to become the state’s property.

Think Back

Have you ever moved without getting your utility deposit back, or forgotten about an old checking or savings account? That money is still yours and you can get it from your state’s government office.

According to the United States Treasury Department, there is no centralized, government-wide database from which information on unclaimed government assets may be obtained. Each individual Federal agency maintains its own records and would need to research and release that data on a case-by-case basis. Each and every state handles the reporting and collection of unclaimed property and each state has its own laws and methods for recovering unclaimed property.

What is Unclaimed Property?

Unclaimed property can be any financial asset or sum of money that appears to have been abandoned by the owner.

Some typical types of unclaimed property include:

  • Utility deposits, credit balances, store refunds
  • Uncashed dividend, payroll or cashier’s checks
  • Stock certificates or accounts,
  • Bonds, mutual fund accounts
  • Life insurance policy proceeds
  • Undistributed wages
  • Checking and savings accounts
  • Gift certificates
  • Traveler’s Checks
  • Safe deposit boxes
  • Royalty payments
  • Court payments or deposits

State laws require financial institutions, public utilities, and various other entities to report personal property considered abandoned or unclaimed. The account or property must have been inactive for a period of time specified by state law, and the whereabouts of the owner must be unknown.

You might have unclaimed property in any state where you or your relatives have ever lived or done business.

You Might Have Unclaimed Property If…

  • You have moved — with or without — leaving a forwarding address. Moving is the main source of abandoned utility deposits and bank account balances.
  • You have retired, been reassigned, or laid off from a job
  • You have not made a transaction on your checking or savings account for over three years
  • You have stopped payments on an insurance policy
  • You have an uncashed check made out to you more than 3 years ago
  • You regularly throw away your mail without reading it.
  • You have noticed that regular dividend, interest, or royalty checks have stopped coming
  • You have settled a deceased family member’s estate

What About Paid Property Search Firms?

There are quite a few firms that advertise that they will “go out” on your behalf and search for unclaimed property that may belong to you. While many of these firms may be honest and offer decent services, you need to be aware and watch out for firms that have already found unclaimed property belonging to you and want to charge you to recover it.

Many states require search firms and so-called ‘heir-finders’ to be licensed or registered and impose legal limits on how large a percentage of the value of the claimed property they can legally charge.

Be sure to always check with the unclaimed property department within your state government before signing a contract with a property search firm if you care to go that route.

Doing it yourself is very practical and quite simple in most cases — If you can find it through the easily searchable databases, and prove that it’s yours, you can claim it yourself at NO CHARGE or FEE and by using the online claim forms which you simply print out, follow directions and mail.

Locate unclaimed money online, get claim forms and information. Remember that you might have unclaimed property in any state where you or your relatives have ever lived or done business.

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So……….

The question is asked……….

What would you do with money you never knew you had?

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How To Find Your Unclaimed Property

All 50 states have a Department of Revenue and Unclaimed Property or some similarly named division. This is the office responsible for maintaining the missing money and processing claims for it. Some states have limitations on how long they keep abandoned property before turning it over to state coffers, however they are still obligated to keep it indefinitely.

You’ll need to check with your individual state to find out what their procedures are. If you think you may have missing money held by your state, your first step is to contact the proper state agency (the links below will help get you to the right department) to find out whether your name, or in the case that it may be the estate of a deceased family member, that their name is on the list. Each state maintains a publicly available list of abandoned property holdings. If you or the person you represent is on the list your next step is to file a claim and return the form with the required identification or proof of ownership.

Requirements for proving ownership will vary from state to state, based on the amount of the claim (other factors may also come into play). Acceptable forms of identification may include a copy of your driver’s licenses, state ID card, military ID card, a current passport, utility or insurance receipts, social security card, bank account numbers, savings passbooks, checking account and bank statements, or other notarized documents. Speculation is that possibly 10% of the U.S. population is owed money from abandoned property. The state departments do not have the resources to investigate every case….. therefore much of it goes unclaimed.

Wondering if your state has money in your name?


Check out your state’s link below…..

Links to Each State’s Claim Division

Canadian Province Links

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Additional Resources:

Missing Money.comDatabase of governmental unclaimed property records

Unclaimed.org – National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators [NAUPA]

Bank of Canada/Unclaimed Balance Search – National Database of Bank of Canada

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Christmas Fun

christmas fun all-in-one banner

Santas-on-internetAre you looking for something to help pass the time when you’re bored? – Maybe looking for something to fill in the gap during your break or down-time in your hectic schedule – Maybe something to enjoy with your kids or grandkids – Well, here are some fun Christmas and Holiday related posts from this website to check out and enjoy 🙂

Within This Blog/Website: north pole sign cartoon

Merry Christmas victorian village snow arch

christmas fun banner

Cool Christmas Sites Elsewhere On The Web:

Enjoy Christmas with Santa Claus at the North pole at this award-winning Christmas website. Send a letter to Santa Clause or a Christmas card to a friend.

Educational and informative site – lots to see, do, watch and learn from here from The History Channel – Learn about Christmas facts, history and traditions – Trivia & Videos to check out – lots to learn about Santa, Christmas Trees and Toys! Will Appeal to All Ages

Xmas Fun is dedicated to the child in all of us. Fun for all ages. Christmas songs, jokes, games, stories, downloads, graphics, etc. Lots of Christmas fun!

Build and create toys here in Santa’s Toy Shop – Simply follow picture directions and race against the clock – Skill levels increase as you move through each toy.

Santa Claus Animation Station – Santa Claus Christmas Website for Kids
Celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa with SANTA CLAUS, Elves and Reindeer
An Animated, Interactive, FREE North Pole Christmas Tradition Since 1996!

Did You Know?

A Quick Fact Guide to the

Christmas Holiday

  • Did you know that Christmas is the largest card-sending holiday in the United States? More than 1.9 billion cards are sent to family and friends every year — one billion more than the 192 million cards given or sent on Valentine’s Day, the nation’s second largest card holiday.
  • Did you know that December 19th is the busiest mailing day of the year? The U.S. Postal Service delivers some 20 billion letters, packages and cards between Thanksgiving and Christmas, with December 19th seeing double the number of parcels than any other day of the year.
  • Did you know that as many as 30 million live (real) Christmas trees are sold every year in the United States? In 2004, live Christmas tree sales amounted to more than $506 billion in revenue for America’s 22,000 tree farms. The state leader in Christmas tree production is Oregon, with sales of $143 million.
  • Did you know that for every live Christmas tree that is harvested, three seedlings are planted in its place?
  • Did you know that it takes an average of seven years for a Christmas tree to reach six feet tall? Some trees take as long as 15 years to grow to their harvesting height; others reach it in as little as four years.
  • Did you know that China is the leading manufacturer of artificial Christmas trees? According to the U.S. Commerce Department, more than 80 percent of artificial trees are made in China.
  • Did you know that in 2005, Americans spent more money on Chinese-made Christmas ornaments ($561 million) than on Christmas trees grown in the United States?
  • Did you know that the character of Santa Claus is based on two Christmas legends: Saint Nicolas and Father Christmas? Saint Nicolas was the patron saint of children, who generously gave gifts to poor and orphaned young ones. Father Christmas was the spirit of good tidings.
  • Did you know that Santa Claus arrived in the United States in the 18th century via the Dutch founders of New York City? The Dutch introduced America to their “Sinterklaas” festivities. Sinterklaas is the Dutch name for Saint Nicolas.
  • Did you know that the first recorded mention of Santa Claus in the United States was in 1773? The New York press reported a story about a “St. A Claus.”
  • Did you know that the tradition of giving gifts for Christmas is rooted in the story of the wise men, who gave costly gifts to baby Jesus without the expectation of receiving anything in return?
  • Did you know that in 2008, with an economic recession in full swing, the nation is expected to spend significantly less on Christmas gifts than in 2007? 46% of Americans say they will spend “less” than in 2007, which is the highest negative response to this question in two decades. Same holds true for 2009.
  • Did you know that during the Black Friday shopping weekend (the Thursday through Sunday after Thanksgiving), consumer spending rose 7% over 2007, to a total of $41 billion.
  • Did you know that American shoppers say they are planning to spend an average of $431 on gifts for the holiday season,down from $859 last year? During the Black Friday shopping weekend, the average person spent $372.57.
  • Did you know that the Monday following Thanksgiving is referred to as Cyber Monday and is a time when many on-line retailers offer deep discounts? In 2008, 36% of consumers said they would spend half of their Christmas shoppingbudget or more on-line.

Merry Christmas 2012 wreath ornaments

S

Thanksgiving Facts Legends Myths & Traditions

You are about to discover a lot of fascinating facts, legends, myths and traditions associated with Thanksgiving. Some you may already be familiar with – while others you may learn a thing or two about one of America’s most well-known and favorite holidays. The following may overwhelm you but should definitely answer just about everything you wanted or needed to know about Thanksgiving.  With all this newly acquired knowledge and information, you can impress and ‘wow’ your family, relatives and friends at the Thanksgiving feast/table. You just might want to include plans for some exercise the next day as the average American eats a day and a half worth of calories in one meal. It’s probably a good idea to join the holiday shopping rush on Black Friday – about 10 hours should do it!  Shopping burns approximately 300 calories an hour!

Bon Appetite & Good Luck 😛

Nowadays, Thanksgiving Day is celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November in the United States, but not always. Now let’s take a closer look on Thanksgiving facts, legends, myths and traditions…..

What We Eat

  • Americans feast on 535 million pounds of turkey on Thanksgiving.
  • According the U.S. Department of Agriculture, more than 45 million turkeys are cooked and eaten in the United States at Thanksgiving. That number represents one sixth of all the turkeys sold in the U.S. each year!
  • The average person consumes 4,500 calories on Thanksgiving Day. (Now that’s a lot of turkey!)
  • The cranberry got its name because the pale pink blossoms on the plant resembled a crane’s head and neck. The name cranberry stuck, eventually becoming cranberry.
  • Fresh cranberries are ideal for cranberry sauce. Cranberries of the highest quality will always bounce! (Make sure you wash the cranberries before eating if you try this at home!)

The Living Turkey

  • Domesticated turkeys cannot fly, however wild turkeys can fly up to 55 miles per hour over short distances.
  • Only male (‘tom’) turkeys gobble. Females make a clicking noise. The famous gobble is actually a seasonal mating call.
  • The heaviest turkey ever raised weighed in at 86 pounds – about the size of a German Shepherd! (But turkeys are normally not used as police animals.)
  • A turkey under 16 weeks of age is called a ‘fryer’. A five to seven month old turkey is called a ‘roaster’.
  • The Turkey Trot, a ballroom dance in the 1900s, was named for the short, jerky steps of the turkey. It became popular mainly because it was denounced by the Vatican as “suggestive.”
  • Turkeys can drown if they look up when it’s raining!
  • A spooked turkey can run at speeds up to 20 miles per hour. They can also burst into flight approaching speeds between 50-55 mph in a matter of seconds.
  • A wild turkey has excellent vision and hearing. Their field of vision is about 270 degrees… one of the main reasons they continue to elude some hunters.
  • Turkeys spend the night in trees. They fly to their roosts around sunset.
  • Turkeys fly to the ground at first light and feed until mid-morning. Feeding resumes in mid-afternoon.
  • Gobbling starts before sunrise and can continue through most of the morning.
  • Turkeys are able to adapt to a wide variety of habitats. However, most turkeys are found in hardwood forests with grassy areas.

That First Thanksgiving

  • On December 11, 1620 the first Pilgrims landed in North America at Plymouth Rock
  • By the fall of 1621 only half of the pilgrims, who had sailed across the Atlantic Ocean to the new land survived. These survivors, thankful to be alive, decided to give a thanksgiving feast.
  • The first Thanksgiving celebration can be traced back to the Plymouth Pilgrims in the fall of 1621.
  • The Pilgrims sailed on the ship, which was known by the name of ‘Mayflower’.
  • They celebrated the first Thanksgiving Day at Plymouth, Massachusetts in the fall of 1621.
  • The drink that the Puritans brought with them in the Mayflower was the beer.
  • The Pilgrim leader, Governor William Bradford, had organized the first Thanksgiving feast in the year 1621 and invited the neighboring Wampanoag Indians to the feast.
  • The Wampanoag Chief Massasoit and about ninety of his tribesmen were invited to the first thanksgiving feast as a way of thanking them for teaching the Pilgrims how to cultivate the land as well as survival skills.
  • The first Thanksgiving celebration in 1621 lasted for three days and included food and games.
  • The first Thanksgiving feast was held to thank the Lord for sparing the lives of the survivors of the Mayflower, who landed at Plymouth Rock on December 11, 1620. The survivors included four adult women and almost forty percent children.
  • The average age of the Mayflower passenger was 32. The oldest Mayflower passenger was 64.
  • Contrary to popular belief, the Pilgrims did not have big buckles on their clothing, shoes, or hats.
  • Buckles did not come into fashion until the late 1600s – more appropriate for the Salem Witchcraft trial time period.
  • There was no milk, cheese, bread, butter or pumpkin pie at the original Thanksgiving Day feast.

The Making of A National Holiday

  • President George Washington issued the first national Thanksgiving Day Proclamation in the year 1789 and again in 1795.
  • President Thomas Jefferson scoffed at the idea of establishing a national “Thanksgiving Day.
  • The state of New York officially made Thanksgiving Day an annual custom in 1817.
  • Sarah Josepha Hale, an editor with a magazine, started a Thanksgiving campaign in 1827 and it was a result of her efforts that in 1863 Thanksgiving was observed as a day for national thanksgiving and prayer.
  • Abraham Lincoln issued a ‘Thanksgiving Proclamation’ on October 3, 1863 and officially set aside the last Thursday of November as the national day for Thanksgiving… whereas previous presidents used to make an annual proclamation to specify the day when Thanksgiving was to be held. However, after his death, is wasn’t followed.
  • President Franklin D. Roosevelt restored the last Thursday of November as Thanksgiving Day in the year 1939. He did so to make the Christmas shopping season longer and thus stimulate the national economy.
  • Congress passed an official proclamation in 1941 and declared that from then forward, Thanksgiving will be observed as a legal holiday on the fourth Thursday of November every year.
  • Benjamin Franklin wanted the turkey to be the national bird of the United States. But it was Thomas Jefferson who opposed him. It is believed that Franklin then named the male turkey as ‘tom’ to spite Jefferson.

More American Traditions

  • The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, an American institution and tradition, has been held annually since 1920.
  • It’s so prominent in New York that Thanksgiving is referred to in NYC as Macy’s Day.
  • The end of the parade signals the official beginning of the Christmas Season, consummated by Black Friday where shoppers officially begin the holiday rush.
  • Black Friday is traditionally the busiest shopping day of the year where stores open earlier than usual and stay open later than usual – with long lines waiting many hours before the stores open.
  • The Thanksgiving Classic football game was first organized by the Detroit Lions in 1920 to boost ticket sales. The Lions have played home games annually on Thanksgiving Day since that time. The Dallas Cowboys have also played on Turkey Day annually since 1966. Since then, teams traditionally wear throwback jerseys to commemorate their team’s history.

Interesting Odds & Ends

  • The day before Thanksgiving is the largest day in the United States for bar sales. New Years Eve comes in a close second.
  • About 78% of employees get paid leave Wednesday through Friday of Thanksgiving Week.
  • Thanksgiving week is also considered one of the busiest travel periods of the entire year.
  • The ‘wishbone’ of the turkey is used in a good luck ritual on Thanksgiving Day.
  • Californians are the largest consumers of turkey in the United States.
  • In Canada, Thanksgiving is celebrated on the second Monday in October.
  • Israel has the highest consumption of turkey per capita: 12 kg (27 lb).

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Legends & Myths

No one really knows why we eat turkey on Thanksgiving, but since 1621 that has been the tradition. Approximately 91% of people eat turkey adding up to the sale of over 280 million turkeys for Thanksgiving celebrations. That’s about 7.3 billion pounds of turkey.

Archeologists have found evidence that turkeys were roaming the United States 10 million years ago. According to the Guinness Book of World Records the largest turkey weighed 86 lbs. It won the Heaviest Turkey competition in London on December 12.

Probably the strangest thing you’ve heard about turkey is that it contains tryptophan, a natural sedative. While it is true that turkey contains tryptophan, it’s a myth that you get sleepy from eating it. Unfortunately it’s not as simple as that.

Here’s how it works:

Tryptophan is an amino acid that helps your body produce serotonin, a calming agent in the brain that plays a key role in sleep. So that seems simple enough? Tryptophan produces chemicals that make you sleepy so that is why everyone takes their post-dinner nap on Turkey Day.

Wrong –

Pharmaceutical companies, learning that the chemical produced serotonin, started producing medication in the 1980s for insomniacs. In 1990 the FDA banned tryptophan supplements because the chemical lead to severe muscle pain and even death. While tryptophan does produce serotonin it takes a large of the amino acid to produce enough to knock you out. Unfortunately, that amount can cause serious health problems.

Here’s why tryptophan in turkey doesn’t make you sleepy –

1st — Tryptophan levels in turkey are minimal – almost unrecognizable.

2nd — Tryptophan only works well on an empty stomach. When you have food in your system, tryptophan has to compete with all the other amino acids in your system, so an even less amount makes it to your brain.

Sorry guys but this is just an urban legend.

The real reason you get sleepy is simple — You over eat — The average meal contains 3000 calories, most of which are carbohydrates. This means your body is working overtime to digest everything causing that post-meal lethargy.

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Additional Facts & Figures

The preliminary estimate of turkeys raised in the United States in 2009 is 250 million. That’s down 8 percent from the number raised during 2008. The turkeys produced in 2008 together weighed 7.9 billion pounds and were valued at $4.5 billion.

Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service http://www.nass.usda.gov/

The preliminary estimate of turkeys Minnesota expected to raise in 2009  is 45.5 million. The Gopher State was tops in turkey production, followed by North Carolina (37.5 million), Arkansas (28 million), Missouri (21 million), Virginia (16.4 million) and California (15 million). These six states together would probably account for about two-thirds of U.S. turkeys produced in 2009.

The forecast for U.S. cranberry production in 2009 is 709 million pounds.. Wisconsin is expected to lead all states in the production of cranberries, with 400 million pounds, followed by Massachusetts (190 million). New Jersey, Oregon and Washington are also expected to have substantial production, ranging from 16 million to 54 million pounds.

The total weight of sweet potatoes — another popular Thanksgiving side dish — produced by major sweet potato producing states in 2008 is 1.8 billion. North Carolina (874 million pounds) produced more sweet potatoes than any other state. It was followed by California (437 million pounds) and Mississippi (335 million pounds).

Total production of pumpkins produced in the major pumpkin-producing states in 2008 is 1.1 billion pounds. Illinois led the country by producing 496 million pounds of the vined orange gourd. Pumpkin patches in California, Pennsylvania and New York also provided lots of pumpkins: Each state produced at least 100 million pounds. The value of all pumpkins produced by major pumpkin-producing states was $141 million.

If you prefer cherry pie, you will be pleased to learn that the nation’s forecasted tart cherry production for 2009 totals 284 million pounds. Of this total, the overwhelming majority (220 million) will be produced in Michigan.

The total volume of wheat — the essential ingredient of bread, rolls and pie crust — produced in the United States in 2009 is 2.2 billion bushels. North Dakota and Kansas accounted for 34 percent of the nation’s wheat production.

The 2008 contracted production of snap (green) beans in major snap (green) bean-producing states is 794,777 tons. Of this total, Wisconsin led all states (320,200 tons). Many Americans consider green bean casserole a traditional Thanksgiving dish.

Source: The previous data came from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service http://www.nass.usda.gov/.

The value of U.S. imports of live turkeys from January through July of 2009 — 99.3 percent from Canada is $9.2 million. When it comes to sweet potatoes, however, the Dominican Republic was the source of 60.7 percent ($2.8 million) of total imports ($4.7 million). The United States ran a $5.8 million trade deficit in live turkeys during the period but had a surplus of $23.1 million in sweet potatoes.

Source: Foreign Trade Statistics http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/

The quantity of turkey consumed by the typical American in 2007, with a hearty helping devoured at Thanksgiving time is 13.8 pounds. Per capita sweet potato consumption was 5.2 pounds.

Source: Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2010, Tables 212-213 http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/.

The value of turkeys shipped in 2002 is $3.6 billion. Arkansas led the way in turkey shipments, with $581.5 million, followed by Virginia ($544.2 million) and North Carolina ($453 million). In 2002, poultry businesses whose primary product was turkey totaled 35 establishments, employing about 17,000 people.

Source: Poultry Processing: 2002 http://www.census.gov/prod/ec02/ec0231i311615.pdf

Forecast 2009 receipts to farmers from turkey sales is $3.8 billion. This exceeds the total receipts from sales of products such as barley, oats and sorghum (combined) and peanuts.

Source: USDA Economic Research Service http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/farmincome/finfidmu.htm

Retail cost per pound of a frozen whole turkey in December 2008 was $1.33.

Source: Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2010, Table 717 http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/

Number of places in the United States named after the holiday’s traditional main course is 3. Turkey, Texas, was the most populous in 2008, with 456 residents, followed by Turkey Creek, La. (361) and Turkey, N.C. (272). There are also nine townships around the country named Turkey, three in Kansas.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/013960.html

http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/BasicFactsServlet

http://www.census.gov/popest/cities/cities.html

Number of households across the nation — 117 million – all potential gathering places for people to celebrate the holiday.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements: 2008

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

Source: US Census Bureau

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Here are a couple Thanksgiving related links from this blog to enjoy –

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What Really Scares People: Top 10 Fears

What Really Scares People?

Here’s a question for you to ponder —

Is there anything you can think of, off the top of your head, that you have a fear (phobia) of ? — Be it real or imagined? — maybe ghosts, snakes, spiders, clowns, closets, thunder, the dark, enclosed places, the unknown, heights, flying, death, taxes as an example — Now, while it’s quite commonplace and normal for children to have a few fears while growing up, most of them are overcome as they get older. A few phobias, however, may possibly hang on into adulthood. With that being said, do you ever wonder what scares other people — specifically referring about adults?

A Little About Phobias

Phobias!Even the word sounds scary! — When you have an extreme fear (phobia) of something, it really IS scary.

Common phobias suffered by many people include:

  • Fear of public places (agoraphobia)
  • Fear of flying
  • Fear of public speaking
  • Fear of crowds
  • Fear of animals, or a particular kind of animal
  • Fear of darkness
  • Fear of crossing bridges
  • Fear of heights
  • Fear of driving
  • Fear of water
  • Fear of heart attacks (or other illness)
  • Social phobia

Sounds like quite a list, doesn’t it? — Believe me, this list is the tip of the iceberg. And don’t feel like you’re alone either. It is estimated that 1.8 million people suffer from agoraphobia alone! About 19.2 million people over the age of 18 suffer from some type of specific phobia in a given year! And YES – That’s a HUGE number.

Normal Fears -vs- Irrational Fears

Some fears are normal — We are born with some fears, which is actually a good thing, such as the fear of falling.

Other fears we acquire — Fear of getting hit by a car when you cross the street makes you more careful — Or the fear of cutting yourself helps you be more cautious when using knives and scissors.

However, some fears are irrational phobias. You may even understand that the fear or phobia you have is irrational. Yet, your extreme fear overshadows your rational mind and you give in to the phobia.

10 Most Common Fears

Here are the 10 most common fears (along with their scientific name) that have been widely reported by the adult population, including a brief description of the situation.

(1) – Arachnophobia – The fear of spiders

Seems to be no escape from these eight-legged creatures. They live in our houses, yards and even our work places. The most die-hard arachnophobes are even scared of pictures of spiders.

(2) – Social phobia – The fear of social situations

More than just simple shyness — This is an extreme fear of being scrutinised by others, or by being humiliated even by your own actions.

(3) – Aerophobia – The fear of flying

Generally meant to be by airplane, however it can crossover into another fear of being suspended above ground – known as acrophobia (see #6 below). Also, this can often be paired with claustrophobia (see #5 below).

(4) – Agoraphobia – The fear of inescapable situations

The result is anxiety and panic attacks, which can easily become self-perpetuating. Extreme agoraphobes are confined to their own home, which is the only place they consider to be safe.

(5) – Claustrophobia – The fear of confined spaces

These poor sufferers will stay well away from elevators, trains and tiny cupboards under the stairwells. May cause panic attacks if escape is not possible.

(6) – Acrophobia – The fear of heights

Sufferers may have panic attacks and put themselves in genuine danger if they can’t get down. Often confused with vertigo – which is merely a dizzy or spinning sensation and not necessarily caused by heights.

(7) – Emetophobia – The fear of vomit

This one nobody even likes to THINK about. No one likes the sight or smell of vomit, but these sufferers will go to extraordinary lengths to avoid the stuff.

(8) – Carcinophobia – The fear of cancer

Although it’s not contagious, a carcinophobe will believe he/she has cancer because he/she has touched someone else with the disease.

(9) – Brontophobia – The fear of thunderstorms

Also known as astraphobia. This is one of those fears that may ‘holdover’ from childhood. Child and adult sufferers alike hide away from thunder and lightning, lest they suffer panic attacks and have difficulty breathing.

(10) – Necrophobia – The fear of death

Derived from the fear of being buried alive, after early excavations of coffins showed scratch marks made by trapped victims. Also relates to coffins and corpses.

Overall Effects of Phobias

Phobias lead to anxiety attacks and depression. Those people affected many times prefer to lead a secluded life for fear of being laughed at. They feel awful and have an extremely difficult time facing the world and owning up to their strange and bizarre phobias. Professional help may be the order of the day to help overcome these fears and lead a somewhat normal existence.

Uncommon & Bizarre Phobias

Instead of an evolutionary or culture-led phobia, there may be a separate explanation for weird or strange phobias, such as the fear of cheese. This group of phobias may be linked to deep-seated psychological trauma. For whatever reason, that inanimate object or non-threatening situation has become the focus of the fear, and acts as a trigger for stored feelings of anxiety.

The common “specific phobias” – such as the fear of spiders, or snakes, or being struck by lightning – are all understandable… at least on some level. We may not fully understand the extreme fear response some people give them but somewhere in there is a threat to survival.

Below you will find a list of uncommon – and in some cases – bizarre phobias – which really do prove utterly terrifying and disgusting to a small part of the general population.

  • Ablutophobia – the obsessional fear of bathing
  • Adipophobia – the fear of appearing too fat
  • Agyrophobia – the fear of crossing roads
  • Ambulophobia – the fear of walking
  • Anablephobia – the fear of looking up
  • Androphobia – the fear of men
  • Anthophobia – the fear of flowers
  • Arachibutyrophobia – the fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of one’s mouth
  • Aulophobia – the fear of flutes
  • Barophobia – the fear of gravity
  • Cataptrophobia – the fear of mirrors
  • Chionophobia – the fear of snow
  • Chorophobia – the fear of dancing
  • Chromatophobia – the fear of colors
  • Chronomentrophobia – the fear of time
  • Cnidophobia – the fear of string
  • Cyberphobia – the fear of working with computers
  • Decidophobia – the fear of making decisions
  • Ephebiphobia the fear of teenagers
  • Ergophobia – the fear of work, finding work or functioning at work
  • Erotophobia – the fear of sex or talking about sex
  • Gelotophobia – the obsessional fear of being laughed at
  • Genuphobia – the fear of knees
  • Geumapobia – the fear of taste
  • Gerontophobia – the fear of growing old or fear of the elderly
  • Gymnophobia – the fear of being seen naked or seeing others naked
  • Gynophobia – the fear of women
  • Haptephobia – the fear of being touched
  • Heliophobia – the fear of sunlight
  • Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia – the fear of long words 😛 Really!
  • Hypnophobia – the fear of sleep
  • Kyphophobia – the fear of stooping
  • Levophobia – the fear of objects to the left
  • Megalophobia – the fear of large or oversized objects
  • Metrophobia – the fear of poetry
  • Mnemophobia – the fear of memories
  • Nomophobia the fear of being out of cellular/mobile phone contact
  • Octophobia – the fear of the figure eight
  • Ommetaphobia – the fear of eyes
  • Osmophobia – the fear of smells
  • Optophobia – the fear of opening one’s eyes
  • Papaphobia – the fear of the Pope
  • Peladophobia – the fear of bald people
  • Phagophobia the fear of swallowing
  • Phobophobia – the fear of having a phobia
  • Scopophobia the fear of being looked at
  • Scuirophobia – the fear of squirrels
  • Siderophobia – the fear of stars
  • Somniphobia – the fear of sleep
  • Spectrophobia the fear of mirrors
  • Trichophobia the fear of loose hairs
  • Triskaidekaphobia the fear of the number 13
  • Xenophobia – the fear of strangers, foreigners or aliens

A Final Thought

And finally, spare a thought for those very select poor folks who suffer from Panophobia – which translates to those  who are perpetually and continuously afraid of EVERYTHING…..

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